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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Let’s Stop Pruning with “Shear” Ignorance

What’s one of the most obvious and common mistakes made in landscapes anywhere in the southern U.S.? Improper pruning or excessive shearing (though it’s stretching the definition of pruning) of shrubs. Nothing jumps out of a landscape faster than a once graceful, natural-form shrub that has been sheared into a mathematician’s delight – be it round, square, pyramidal or rectangular. From a horticultural standpoint, unnecessary, form-damaging shearing of shrubs is almost as criminal as the topping of trees.

>> read “Let’s Stop Pruning with “Shear” Ignorance”    
Seeds of Simplicity: The Shaker Seed Industry

During the summer months, I can see the results of those tiny seed envelopes that I excitedly purchased in March from ambitiously dog-eared catalogs. A quick inventory of the garden reveals my successes and failures — summer squash overrunning the garden path and tomato seedlings that just stopped trying between my June vacation and Independence Day ...

>> read “Seeds of Simplicity: The Shaker Seed Industry”    
Classic Pepper Sauce

Wash and sterilize several saved bottles such as those for soy sauce, beer, small wine bottles, soft drinks, vinegar, Worcestershire and other appropriate bottles saved or bought for pepper sauce ...

>> read “Classic Pepper Sauce”       #Recipes
Whitewater Red Bud
Cercis canadensis

Cercis canadensis ‘Whitewater’ is a “hot plant” out of North Carolina and a North American native tree too! This small, deciduous tree with beautifully variegated white and green leaves was developed by Dr. Dennis Werner at North Carolina State University. It’s a good choice to incorporate into your garden where contrasting foliage color is desired. Traditional magenta-pink flowers of the redbud emerge in the early spring on bare branches ...

>> read “Whitewater Red Bud”       #Hot Plants
Variegated Plants
Exclamation Points in the Garden

When I designed the perennial border in the garden of our first home, it was a process of trial and error. All the books I studied told me I should first create an evergreen “backbone” to provide year-round interest, and plant so that something of interest was blooming each season.

>> read “Variegated Plants”    
A Show of Force
Forcing fabulous spring flowering bulbs is easy

Bulbs have always intrigued me. Their much-appreciated splash of color during a generally bleak time of year brightens our lives and reminds us that warmer days are ahead. Forcing bulbs is just another way of enjoying the jewels of the late winter and spring garden, but you get to schedule the show. Let’s explore the mystery of bulbs and discuss the techniques involved in forcing them into flower ...

>> read “A Show of Force”    
Wildlife-Friendly Gardening
Helping Little Creatures So They Can Return the Favor

Ask any gardener what their definition is of a garden and you will get a different answer each time. For most of us, it’s a place of beauty, a place of serenity, somewhere to let out our frustrations, get some exercise or all of the above.

>> read “Wildlife-Friendly Gardening”    
High Octane Vines
Garden Rooms Exhibit Creativity

Many gardeners today are transforming their landscape with “high octane” vines that grow with extreme vigor, climb easily on their own with tendrils or disks and provide almost instant cover. These hot, new vines may be annuals or perennials, depending on the selection.

>> read “High Octane Vines”    
Fungus Gnats

Fungus gnats are common pests of potted plants. The adults are tiny, mosquito-like flies. They don’t bite, but can be nuisances flying about the house. Folks who keep potted plants near their computer or TV often notice them flying near the monitor.

>> read “Fungus Gnats”    
The Rudiments Of Roses
Don’t Shy Away From Growing Roses!

Truly there are varieties available for even the most timid or inexperienced gardeners. All roses require some attention, but numerous types are more self sufficient, thriving for years with minimal care.

>> read “The Rudiments Of Roses”    
Turf Rescue 911

When it comes to the months of the year, I have to admit that August is not among my favorites. While I am very much an outdoor person and enjoy working in my garden and managing my small farm, I do not enjoy the blistering heat and humidity that August almost always provides. Many years ago, my father was transferred to the South, and I have somehow endured the summer heat of August ever since. Thank goodness for air-conditioning! While I can step inside to cool off ...

>> read “Turf Rescue 911”    
Mad for Moss
Stop forcing turf and try this primitive plant

When it comes to moss in the garden, I’m smitten, I’m in love and I can’t help it. Ever since this group of primitive plants started making its way into my shade garden, I’ve grown more attached and have expanded its use and presentations in many ways. For purposes of simplicity, I’m lumping mosses and liverworts together and referring to them as moss. Moss has the ability to fit into many garden styles. Japanese, woodland, shade, native, rock, water and tropical gardens all play host to moss in various ways. In Japan, moss has been an integral part of gardens for over 1,000 years.

>> read “Mad for Moss”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Aquaponics finally flourishing!
Summer planting in the Aquaponics system

[+] SC Container Garden


Blooms and Beds and Garden Buddies
Springtime splendor and busy gardening.

[+] The Backyard Dirt


The Summer of Rain
Six-foot tall cosmos and a lush yard!

[+] An Editor's Garden