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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Making Garden Memories

This winter, I’ve been thinking about how plants add meaning to our lives. I’m not thinking about our food plants, our medicinal plants or even plants that house us and clothe our bodies. Obviously, plants preserve and sustain our lives, and a study of even one economic plant is a fascinating pursuit. Rather, I am considering the plants that add sentimental value to life.

>> read “Making Garden Memories”    
Rose Black Spot

Rose black spot is perhaps the most devastating disease of roses in the South. This disease is caused by a fungus (Diplocarpon rosae) that attacks the foliage of many rose varieties in home landscapes. Many dedicated rose growers battle black spot year after year. The disease can flare up virtually anytime of the year when the leaves remain wet for a period of six or more hours at a time. Frequent rainfall with cloudy days or periods of high humidity can result in disease onset.

>> read “Rose Black Spot”    
Sweet Alyssum Wonderland Series
Lobularia maritima

Sweet alyssum, as the name hints, is certainly a sweet-smelling annual, but it’s often grown in such small quantities that the smell is overlooked. Butterflies are drawn to the fragrant small flowers that range in color from blue to lavender, pink, yellow and white.

>> read “Sweet Alyssum Wonderland Series”       #Hot Plants
Muhly grass
Muhlenbergia capillaris

One of the native ornamental grasses that has received a considerable amount of attention the past few years is muhly grass. Not likely to be noticed in the spring and summer, it puts on quite a show in the landscape during the fall.

>> read “Muhly grass”       #Hot Plants
Creating the Woodland Garden
Selecting plants is tough. Let us help you find the one.

When making decisions about any specific landscape situation, we must consider issues like design, style, plant preferences, sun or shade tolerance, topography, soil type, and moisture conditions. In some cases, the situation may suggest a number of possible alternatives. But occasionally, the site lends itself to an ideal single solution. Such is the case with a tree-covered area that either sits on the property line or surrounds the home. By implementing a natural design that accentuates the existing landscape, this forest-like setting can be transformed into a woodland garden.

>> read “Creating the Woodland Garden”    
The American Chestnut Story
Hopefully there will be a happy ending

It’s sad, but much of today’s news contains stories about the endangerment or extinction of a plant or animal, or even an outright environmental catastrophe. Contrary to that trend, when I recently stumbled on an article about efforts to restore the endangered American chestnut tree to a place of importance in our forests, I immediately thought...

>> read “The American Chestnut Story”    
Home Grown Citrus
Grow Your Own Cold Hardy, Sweet Or Sour Fruit

Late fall and winter mean many things to us as gardeners. There are trees to be planted, catalogs to read, soil to be amended and if you are fortunate, oranges, lemons and kumquats to be eaten.

>> read “Home Grown Citrus”    
The Underappreciated Biennial

Fans of perennial flowers admire both their longevity in the garden and their capabilities. Where they once planted a daylily, by division, they can have three or more clumps in a few years. Fans of annuals tout their quick results and their lengthy bloom period. Pop in your six-pack and, if it isn’t blooming already, it soon will be – and will bloom for months on end. No wonder biennials are the Rodney Dangerfields of the flower world ...

>> read “The Underappreciated Biennial”    
More Backyard Birds
Woody Plants That Attract Birds

As we transition to winter weather, we start waiting – we wait for bluebirds to brighten our days. We wait for robins, the harbingers of spring, to return. What to do? Perhaps you should think about planting some trees or shrubs.

>> read “More Backyard Birds”    
White Fringe Tree
a.k.a. Grancy Graybeard or Old Man’s Beard

White fringe tree also answers to the names grancy graybeard and old man’s beard. It is a member of the Oleaceae (olive) family, along with forsythia, ash (Fraxinus), olive (Olea) and lilac (Syringa).

>> read “White Fringe Tree”       #Hot Plants
Barking Up the Right Tree

Bark may not be the first thing that comes to mind when choosing a tree. Even those of us who are quick to celebrate the practical significance that trees play in our lives often neglect to consider the simple beauty of their bark.

>> read “Barking Up the Right Tree”    
Plant Your Bulbs in Turf!

Planting bulbs in turf is a great way to enhance your landscape and add a spark of interest to your lawn. Plantings can either be annual or perennial, and you can choose from a wide variety of bulbs.

>> read “Plant Your Bulbs in Turf!”