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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Garden Mailbox

Plant a mailbox in the garden and you can keep garden tools in the garden, right where you need them. When the old mailboxes were replaced in the neighborhood, they were recycled into small “onsite garden storage units.” The garden mailbox is a good gathering place for storing garden tools and accessories. It could save you endless trips to the shed or garage for a garden tool.

>> read “Garden Mailbox”       #Tools
Indoors Today, Outdoors Tomorrow

When winter descends, spring’s warmth can’t arrive soon enough for the avid gardener. Many begin designing new garden plans and waiting for winter to thaw. The wait is over. You can garden year round in your home with interior foliage. Any garden veteran can become a successful interiorscaper by applying the same principles he or she uses outdoors. It is all a matter of the right plant in the right place ...

>> read “Indoors Today, Outdoors Tomorrow”    
Oh, Deer! 10 Tips for Keeping Deer out of Your Garden

A small herd of hungry deer —or even just a couple — can wipe out entire hosta beds, rows of hedges, swaths of daylilies and tulips and eat all of your roses. Close your garden “salad bar” by using several of these tips ...

>> read “Oh, Deer! 10 Tips for Keeping Deer out of Your Garden”    
Purpletop Vervain
Verbena bonariensis

I will never run out of plants to discuss as I love so many, but I asked my friends what they will be thinking about in January/February and in unison I heard “seeds.” So, an easy plant from seed it is — one of my favorites is Verbena bonariensis.

>> read “Purpletop Vervain”       #Hot Plants
Dress for Gardening Success

I am the last person you would ask about the latest ladies’ fashion. Really. I still own sweaters older than my sons. They are in college. But I do know a great bargain when I see it, and I like to look a little spiffy. Plus, I am very into comfort. So maybe you really should ask me what I like to wear in the garden. This year, it is full-skirted dresses of all sorts (on the cheap, too).

>> read “Dress for Gardening Success”    
A Go-To Plant

Is there something in your wardrobe, a go-to outfit that you throw on when you need to look good and don’t have time to put a lot of thought into it? I’d be lost without those reliable clothes in my closet. In my garden, that role is filled by Sesleria autumnalis. This grass is commonly called autumn moor grass. I call it “friend” ...

>> read “A Go-To Plant”    
Majestic Pampas Grass

Pampas is actually a perennial grass, native to South America. It grows in large clumps 8 to 10 feet tall with silvery white, rose, purple or pinkish silken plumes that look like feathers sitting atop long stalks. There are dwarf varieties that grow to a height of 4 to 5 feet tall, which seems to be preferred by those gardeners with a smaller space ...

>> read “Majestic Pampas Grass”    
Gardening When it Hurts

After a day of gardening, do you crawl into bed with a heat pack, an ice pack or maybe even a six-pack? Do you have special pillows for knee pain, neck pain and a pair of wrist splints for carpal tunnel pain? When you limp to the kitchen for a midnight snack of aspirin, are there so many magnets strapped to your body that you stick to the refrigerator door?

>> read “Gardening When it Hurts”    
Coir competency

Once considered a waste product, coir is now used as mulch, soil conditioner and as a hydroponic growth medium. This organic fiber is an ideal material for worm composers. It is also used to grow mushrooms. It is bacteria free and will deter slugs ...

>> read “Coir competency”       #Fertilizing
Problems with Woodchucks

Except on Groundhog’s Day, when they are cute, cuddly weather prognosticators, woodchucks are burrowing and plant-eating pests. Here’s what you should know about this rodent for the other 364 days of the year.
Spring finds gardeners dreaming of their best gardens yet. But, beware! There are critters dreaming of your gardens, too, one being the woodchuck ...

>> read “Problems with Woodchucks”    
Clever Crafting for Fall

Ohio has had such a lovely fall this year! With the intense heat of this past summer and the lack of moisture, I was wondering if the leaves wouldn't just turn brown and fall off but alas, the cool evenings and bright sunshine have yielded a fall with vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red. My daughter commented the other morning that the trees were “losing their clothes” and I laughed at the ...

>> read “Clever Crafting for Fall”    
The Phosphorous-Free Lawn

Lawn care is experiencing a revolution at its roots. And 2012 is a watershed year, literally and figuratively. Garden center shelves will have few if any turf fertilizers with phosphorous (the P in NPK). Most commercially manufactured lawn care products will be completely free of phosphorous. Others will have less nitrogen (N) too ...

>> read “The Phosphorous-Free Lawn”    
 
 
 

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