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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Grow a Salsa Garden—Everything but Tortilla Chips

If you are a salsa fan, you can grow an edible garden designed specifically to make this spicy sauce. Tomatoes, tomatillos, hot or sweet peppers, onions, cilantro—you can grow it all ...

>> read “Grow a Salsa Garden—Everything but Tortilla Chips”    
Natives Can Be Neat

Incorporating native plants into your garden doesn’t mean that the space will look wild and messy. Here are some neat natives to add for a sophisticated pop of color and texture ...

>> read “Natives Can Be Neat”    
You Can Eat Your Roses!
And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums …

And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums … there are several beautiful common flowers in your ornamental garden that can add flavor to your food and add color as a garnish. Here’s where to start. Did you know that roses are red and edible too? Well not all roses are red, but they are edible and most definitely delicious too. I didn’t know that until I took a trip to England and Wales in 1999 with two girlfriends on a whirlwind tour of English and Welsh gardens ...

>> read “You Can Eat Your Roses!”    
Flowers that bridge the gap between summer and fall

August is a tough month in many gardens. The blooms of June and July are fading and the asters and mums, traditionally associated with autumn, are not yet flowering. Depending on the year, August can be hot and dry and even the hardiest blooms can appear to be faded, like an old house dress hung out week after week to dry in the sun.

>> read “Flowers that bridge the gap between summer and fall”    
Stiff Bluestar
Amsonia rigida

Stiff bluestar is an easy-to-grow, but underused, addition to the Pennsylvania garden. Native to open woodlands of the Gulf Coast region, stiff bluestar is much hardier (Zones 5 to 9) than its natural range suggests.

>> read “Stiff Bluestar”       #Hot Plants
Three Ways to Celebrate Fall with Pumpkins

Maybe I always wanted to be Cinderella, but who knows? It could take a therapist several years and thousands of dollars to unearth the root cause of this obsession. Whatever the reason, I am hopelessly enchanted by pumpkins each fall. If you suffer from the same condition — and you know who you are — here are some ways to satisfy your pumpkin lust this season.

>> read “Three Ways to Celebrate Fall with Pumpkins”    
Viburnum ‘Cardinal Candy’

One of the showiest viburnums for the landscape is ‘Cardinal Candy’. Its bright-red fruit creates quite a show in the fall, not to be outdone by the cream-colored flowers in spring, as well as the dark-green lustrous leaves that turn maroon and linger until November.

>> read “Viburnum ‘Cardinal Candy’”       #Hot Plants
Bloomin’ Early

March comes in like a lion and out like a lamb. And by the end of March, Midwest gardeners have had it with snow and cold. So when temperatures start to warm up and we get that whiff of spring in the air, we cheer for those perennials that first appear in late March and April. These are our harbingers of spring ...

>> read “Bloomin’ Early”    
Create a Faux Rock Garden on a Hillside or Berm

Steeply sloped areas don’t have to be ‘trouble spots.’ Hillsides can be turned into gorgeous rock gardens. Here are some tips.

>> read “Create a Faux Rock Garden on a Hillside or Berm”    
Standing Up to Salt

It’s no accident that a list of salt-tolerant plants reads a bit like a list of seaside plants. Without even looking at lists of such plants compiled by arboretums and universities, I can begin my own list from memory. Past walks along the coast of Cape Cod provide me with a mental image of plants that live in constant sea spray ...

>> read “Standing Up to Salt”       #Advice
Morgan Oriental Arborvitae
Thuja orientalis ’Morgan’

The very rare, “nearly perfect” plant in the landscape, the compact Morgan Oriental arborvitae (Thuja orientalis ‘Morgan’) is slow-growing to 3 to 4 feet and offers shimmering lime-green foliage in the summer. Foliage turns to an attractive burgundy-orange color in the fall — beginning in September and October in northern areas ...

>> read “Morgan Oriental Arborvitae”       #Hot Plants
Fall Invaders

It happens every year when the nights start getting cold — pests come crawling into your house from every nook and cranny. Here is a look at several home invaders and what to do to deter them.
Autumn is a wonderful time of year, with colorful leaves and invigorating cool weather. However, for many pests the change in season signals the need to seek shelter from the cold winter ahead ...

>> read “Fall Invaders”    
 
 
 

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