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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Fatsia
Fatsia japonica

Learn about Fatsia in this plant profile video.

>> read “Fatsia”       #Plant Profile   #Shade   #Video
Bald Cypress
Taxodium distichum

Learn about the Bald Cypress in this plant profile video.

>> read “Bald Cypress”       #Plant Profile   #Trees   #Video
Caladiums
caladium bicolor

Learn about Caladiums in this plant profile video.

>> read “Caladiums”       #Plant Profile   #Summer   #Video
How to Make Compost

You know fall of the year is the perfect time to start rejuvenating your garden beds for next spring, and in this vegetable garden, the perfect thing to do is add compost now so it can settle in and nutrients can be released in time for the spring plant. So, come on back with us and we’ll show you how to set up a compost pile.

>> read “How to Make Compost”       #Homesteading   #Video
Muhly grass
Muhlenbergia capillaris

As a single specimen or planted en masse, muhly grass (Muhlenbergia capillaris) is dramatic, drought resistant and easy to grow.

Hardy in USDA Zones 5-10, the growing conditions for muhly grass are precise, requiring full sun and excellent drainage for the best results. The optimal time for moving or dividing is during the cooler months, when rainfall or hand watering can be done in abundance – although muhly grass is extremely drought-tolerant once established, it needs copious amounts of water to get the roots settled in to its liking.

>> read “Muhly grass”       #Ornamentals   #Video
How to: Select a Fresh Cut Live Christmas Tree

Today we’re going to show you how to select that perfect live Christmas Tree.

Now the first thing to consider when selecting a live Christmas tree is the height of the tree vs the height of the room it’s going in. Make sure you select a live tree that is going to be proportional to the height of the ceiling in the room the tree is going to be standing in. So, when you go to a Christmas tree farm they’ll often times have these poles marked off at different heights. Now, this tree is approximately 8-feet tall, which means, when you get it in the stand it’s going to be at least a foot taller. So, make sure the room that this tree will go in has a ceiling that’s at least 10-feet tall.

>> read “How to: Select a Fresh Cut Live Christmas Tree”       #Holiday: Christmas   #How to   #Video
How to: Make a Succulent Planter Out of a Book

Hi, I'm Sarah! Today I'm going to show you how to use an old hardcover book and turn it into a planter for a little succulent. All you'll need for this project are some old hardcover books, (you can find them at Goodwill or a thrift store), some clamps, some plastic to line the hole (I'm using these plastic bags that a lot of people have at home), a stapler, a hot glue gun, I'm using this wood glue (It's Guerrilla wood glue), and a small paint brush, I have some spar urethane that I'll spray on to coat everything, a drill (and I have a 3-inch hole saw attachment on the drill), some small succulent plants and I have some bowls of gravel, sand, and a succulent cactus potting mix here.  

>> read “How to: Make a Succulent Planter Out of a Book”       #Containers   #How to   #Video
How To: Change a Sprinkler Nozzle (Part 2)

Alright. So, now we're in the field, and this head has already been installed. So, it's in the ground, and what I need to do is change the nozzle on it because I did have the wrong size nozzle initially. It's probably a number 2 nozzle, and that wouldn't be big enough for a 360 degree radius - which is what we are using. Instead I'm going to put in a number 6 nozzle, so I've selected a nozzle. It's a number 6 nozzle.

>> read “How To: Change a Sprinkler Nozzle (Part 2)”       #How to   #Irrigation   #Video
How To: Change a Sprinkler Nozzle (Part 1)

Alright, now once we have installed an irrigation system – especially a turf irrigation system, we have to look at adjusting it and getting it to work correctly.

>> read “How To: Change a Sprinkler Nozzle (Part 1)”       #How to   #Irrigation   #Video
How to: Dividing Orchids

Here's an example of an orchid that has been in the same container for probably about ten years in the greenhouse. It really should have been divided 2 or 3 times in that period of time, but since it was not, we will try to show you what you would do to get that back in better shape.

>> read “How to: Dividing Orchids”       #Flowers   #How to   #Ornamentals   #Propagation   #Video
How to Turn Compost into Liquid Fertilizer

Today I'm going to show you how to take compost that you can generate at home and turn it into a liquid biologically active fertilizer that you can use in your home garden.

All you'll need to do this is a bucket or other large container that will hold water, aquarium pump and an air stone for an oxygen source for our soil microbes. And we'll put that down in the water and let it bubble. We'll also use the oxygen to help dechlorinate the water if you're using city water. We'll put our compost in a mesh laundry bag which will function like a teabag. We'll measure our compost in a plastic measuring cup, and then we'll provide the soil microbes in the compost tea with a carbohydrate source. And for that, we'll use unsulfured molasses.

>> read “How to Turn Compost into Liquid Fertilizer”       #Fertilizing   #Video
How To Start Vegetable Seeds

Today I'm going to show you how to get your seeds started for your fall vegetables. You can start vegetable seeds in just about any container you have available. Whether it's an egg carton or the containers from your grocery store delicatessen even to the flats and six packs you save from your spring and summer flowers that you buy at your garden centers.

The only requirement is the bottom of the container allow adequate drainage so we don't have seeds sitting in saturated soil . That'll lead to fungal issues and a condition called damping off as the seeds germinate. What I've done with this flat is line it with paper towels so it'll hold soil and allow adequate drainage at the same time. So, all we have to do is fill this flat with our soil until it's level and then pre-moisten the soil. And, again with compost and a mixture of vermiculite and promix, moistening the soil ahead of time won't be a problem.

>> read “How To Start Vegetable Seeds”       #Edibles   #Fall   #Propagation   #Seeds   #Video
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Helpful Tips for Overwintering Plants
Tips for Saving Plants over the winter season

[+] Turning Gardens Into Art