LOUISIANA ARTICLE ARCHIVE

Below you will find our growing collection of Louisiana-specific articles. Enjoy!

BEYOND GREEN

How to liven up your shade garden with a little color Story and Photos by Yvonne Lelong Bordelon In Louisiana, shade gardens are prized for the green coolness they offer on hot, humid summer days – places to sit and relax while sipping a cool drink. A garden in shade can be lovely when planted …

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TIAWAN CHERRY TREE

Story and Photos by Yvonne Lelong Bordelon The sight of the masses of hot pink flowers that cover the bare branches of Taiwan cherry trees in late winter definitely chases the blues away. Hummingbirds, honeybees, and butterflies hurry to sip the nectar. Small cherries soon follow and before they fully ripen, songbirds gobble them up. …

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IT TAKES A VILLAGE

Bringing up a crop of nature lovers Story and Photos by Yvonne Lelong Bordelon The other day, my brother and I were reminiscing about the wonderful experiences we had as children when we spent time with Mom and Dad in the garden. In today’s hustle-bustle world, many children don’t have the opportunity to delight in …

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Turk's Cap

GIANT TURK’S CAP

Story and Photos by Yvonne Lelong Bordelon Giant Turk’s cap is the larger tropical cousin of the popular hummingbird and butterfly plant, Turk’s cap (Malvaviscus arboreus). The bright red, 2-inch flowers of giant Turk’s cap droop downward and never fully open. This multi-stemmed, low-maintenance tropical evergreen shrub is deer resistant and drought tolerant. Use it …

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CELERY

Seasoning of the South Story and Photos by A.J. Heinsz-Bailey Celery (Apium graveolens) is a well-known element of Cajun and Creole cuisine. Along with bell pepper and onion, it is a member of the “Holy Trinity” seasoning mix. You don’t have to be French to appreciate the distinctive earthy aroma of homegrown celery. Jambalaya and …

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UNDER THE BRIDGE

Utilizing footbridges and creeks in the garden Story and Photos by A.J. Heinsz-Bailey Generally speaking, water has never been a problem for Louisiana gardeners. Sometimes, however, what to do with all the water can be a challenge for us. In northern parts of the state, we have hills, and down south, we have lowlands. Working …

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THE SECOND WARM SEASON

Some call it fall, but in Louisiana we call it like we see it Story by Dan Gill Have you noticed? You might have to use your imagination a little bit, but the weather is changing. When you walk out in the morning the air feels just a bit more comfortable (OK, like I said, …

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PICKERELWEED

An ongoing series of plant profiles for Louisiana landscapes Story and Photos by Yvonne Lelong Bordelon A pond filled with masses of 6-inch blue or purple flower spikes jutting from the attractive green foliage of native pickerelweed is a sight to behold. Among the flowers, you will surely see an assortment of brightly colored butterflies, …

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TURNIPS

A vegetable deeply rooted in the South Story and Photos by A.J. Heinsz-Bailey Turnips may not be the most glamorous vegetable in garden, but they have a loyal list of followers. The Scots carved them for Halloween before pumpkins took the job. Farmers used them for livestock fodder. Vermont even named the turnip as its …

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