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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

10 Most (Un)Wanted Pests and What to Do about Them

They don’t have their photos hanging on the post office walls, but these garden pests are notorious. Here are the ‘Most Wanted’ of the Midwest garden, their rap sheets and how to bring them to justice ...

>> read “10 Most (Un)Wanted Pests and What to Do about Them”    
Lilacs

What other plant captivates your senses and evokes fond memories of springtime more than lilacs? The intense fragrance of their large, beautiful flowers and their relative ease of care, make lilacs treasured throughout the temperate world. They bring us a few weeks of fabulous color and fragrance each year, but their loveliness and charm leave lifetime memories ...

>> read “Lilacs”       #Feature
Daffodil Dividends
Plant fall bulbs now for sweet spring rewards

Yes, spring is still months away, but now is the time to invest in planting spring-blooming daffodils. Just imagine the dividends — early dwarf daffodils blooming in a snow-covered rock garden, a drift of classic yellow daffodils gilding a hillside or clusters of double daffodils brightening an entry walkway. Plus, they’re affordable, low maintenance, hardy throughout most of the U.S. and pest resistant. As its botanical name Narcissus indicates ...

>> read “Daffodil Dividends”    
Chartreuse Houseplants

The hot plant for January isn’t a plant at all. It’s a color — chartreuse. Chartreuse goes with just about every other color and never fails to brighten up a dark room on a dreary winter day. Fortunately, there are a number of excellent new houseplants that shine brightly in chartreuse.

>> read “Chartreuse Houseplants”       #Hot Plants
Sitting in the Garden

Our lives are so hectic anymore, working late, attending functions, running children to softball, hockey, dance and wherever they need to be that we have forgotten some of the simple pleasures of life that make us happy.

>> read “Sitting in the Garden”    
Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest

With the cold winter behind and the warm, humid summer just about here, I begin to dream of the tropics, and with that, the full-flavored, juicy fruit whose sweet fragrances fill outdoor markets and lone fruit stands on the side roads. Sadly though, with the economy not cooperating and the present fashion to have stay-cations, I have decided I could and would have both. Thus began my search for the ever-elusive tropical fruits that I could grow in my Kentucky backyard garden.

>> read “Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest”    
Green Gap Perennials

Midwestern gardeners have a narrow gap between the cold of winter and heat of summer. But, because of the fickleness of spring weather, there is often a significant gap between the peak of spring bloom (bulbs, roses and early perennials) and the maturity of summer flowers (annuals and summer perennials, such as echinaceas and daylilies). This gap usually becomes apparent throughout late May and early June, when many people’s gardens are green and growing, but with few flowers ...

>> read “Green Gap Perennials”    
Veggies Front & Center

Many gardeners would like to grow fruits and vegetables but do not have a sunny backyard. Why not use the sunny front yard? It is possible to raise edibles in the front garden and still keep your curb appeal.

>> read “Veggies Front & Center”    
Plant the Right Tree the Right Way for Long-Lasting Beauty

Spring is here and you may be getting ready to plant a new tree. As the saying goes: The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, the next best time is now. Trees are a long-term investment. They take a long time to establish and provide benefits we enjoy. Proper planting practices will help get your trees off to a good start, enhancing your landscape for years to come ...

>> read “Plant the Right Tree the Right Way for Long-Lasting Beauty”       #Trees
Monarda ‘Pardon My Pink’ and ‘Pardon My Purple’

Gardeners have long had a love/hate relationship with bee balm (Monarda spp.). The fragrant perennial herb attracts butterflies and hummingbirds like crazy, but also tends to get powdery mildew and take over the garden. That is, until now ...

>> read “Monarda ‘Pardon My Pink’ and ‘Pardon My Purple’”       #Hot Plants
Thousand Cankers Disease Arrives in Pennsylvania

Plant pathologists are usually not the most imaginative bunch when naming plant diseases. For instance, the rose disease caused by the fungus Diplocarpon rosae, causes a black spot on the foliage. This disease was given the name “black spot.” Another example is the fungal organism that causes a leaf spot on strawberry. In this instance, it was given the colorful name “common leaf spot.”

>> read “Thousand Cankers Disease Arrives in Pennsylvania”    
Turn A Drainage Ditch Into A Dandy Display

“It was a jungle back there,” Schmidt says. And she was afraid her husband would get killed mowing a very steep slope. People pay good money to have a water feature like she had running through the backyard. She wondered, “Why can’t I do something with that?” Regulatory issues, erosion and water quality concerns will likely be challenges when converting a ditch into a garden, no matter where you live in the Midwest ...

>> read “Turn A Drainage Ditch Into A Dandy Display”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Renovate a Neglected Perennial Garden
Steps to renovate a perennial flower bed

[+] North Country Gardening