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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Perennial Vegetables

Now that it is February, we move from seed catalog season to seed starting season. While planning our spring gardens, why not ponder a permanent addition to the garden? Consider adding perennial edibles vegetables that inexpensively produce novel and delectable foods year after year while expanding the harvest season in the garden ...

>> read “Perennial Vegetables”    
Blue Sedge
Carex glauca ‘Blue Zinger’

This carex is easily grown in medium to wet soils. Ideal light is shade to part shade. Many members of the genus share the common name of rush or sedge. The cultivar ‘Blue Zinger’ refers to the bright blue color of the leaves, which endures winter in all but the coldest temperatures ...

>> read “Blue Sedge”       #Hot Plants
You Can Eat Your Roses!
And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums …

And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums … there are several beautiful common flowers in your ornamental garden that can add flavor to your food and add color as a garnish. Here’s where to start. Did you know that roses are red and edible too? Well not all roses are red, but they are edible and most definitely delicious too. I didn’t know that until I took a trip to England and Wales in 1999 with two girlfriends on a whirlwind tour of English and Welsh gardens ...

>> read “You Can Eat Your Roses!”    
10 Power Performers in the Perennial Garden

To every flower there is a season. As winter breathes its last breath, the spring bulbs put on a show of color that gardeners and non-gardeners alike welcome as much as the warmer temperatures. The bright yellows, purples and reds of daffodils, tulips and other ephemerals carry us into early summer, when a whole new wave of color greets us ...

>> read “10 Power Performers in the Perennial Garden”    
Updating an Overgrown Landscape

As some landscapes age, they begin to look overgrown and unattractive. Many times the landscaping was done incorrectly, resulting in the need for a new landscape sooner than would have otherwise been needed ...

>> read “Updating an Overgrown Landscape”       #Landscaping
Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’
Lagerstroemia (indica x fauriei) ‘Pocomoke’

Do you enjoy the late-season flowers of crapemyrtle but don’t have space for a tree? Allow me to introduce you to ‘Pocomoke’—a handsome, dwarf crapemyrtle. It’s not quite knee-high—a densely branched mound of deep rosy-raspberry flowers floating above forest-green leaves.

>> read “Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’”       #Hot Plants
Hold the Salt

Most of the harm from snow really comes from how we get rid of it. Time for a little rethink. Who doesn’t love new snow? The white blanket softens the world and makes everything look new. And it’s a good thing for the garden. Snow cover insulates the soil so it is less likely to thaw and then freeze again. Enveloping snow protects plant tissue from cold snaps and adds moisture when it melts in spring.

>> read “Hold the Salt”    
Deadheading Details

If only all our perennials performed like blanket flower (Gaillardia). It’s one plant that’s flush with flowers, burgeoning buds and attractive globe-shaped seed heads from early summer until frost.

>> read “Deadheading Details”    
Why Do Plants Fail?

Even experts can kill plants—which is why Roy Diblik offers seven common reasons perennials die.
It’s happened to us all. We have plants (usually the prized, expensive ones) that grow for a season—or maybe a few years—and then they die ...

>> read “Why Do Plants Fail?”    
The Beauty of Lavender

I have to confess something. I almost gave up on lavender. I would repeatedly bring home plants, only to watch them gradually wither, sicken and die—or worse—thrive until they were shapeless woody shrubs with hardly any leaves or flowers. Is this you? It took a lot of trial and error, but I finally figured it out. Lavender (Lavandula spp.) is the princess of herbs. Like any other perfumed lady, she has her demands ...

>> read “The Beauty of Lavender”    
Go Out & Look: Winter Scouting for Pests and Diseases

Which plants grew well this year? Which did poorly? Which now have diseases or insects? Now is the time to scout for insects and diseases in the landscape. End-of-the-year scouting is also a great excuse to enjoy a walk through the garden before cold weather sets in.

>> read “Go Out & Look: Winter Scouting for Pests and Diseases”    
Diversify your Landscape
Making better choices for trees and shrubs

Don’t just plant something because all your neighbors have that plant. Think about diversity, and think outside the box. Here are some underused plants that might be better choices than the old standbys. Deciding which trees and shrubs to plant to create an aesthetic ...

>> read “Diversify your Landscape”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Renovate a Neglected Perennial Garden
Steps to renovate a perennial flower bed

[+] North Country Gardening