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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

All-America Selections Winners Take All

This is the time of year that dedicated gardeners sort through their catalogs picking out their seeds for the upcoming planting season. I’m sure that you have noticed a little identifying mark on a seed packet that says “AAS.” That means it is an All-America Selection that has been grown in more than 30 trial gardens all over the United State and Canada ...

>> read “All-America Selections Winners Take All”       #Edibles   #Flowers
Fall Invaders

It happens every year when the nights start getting cold — pests come crawling into your house from every nook and cranny. Here is a look at several home invaders and what to do to deter them.
Autumn is a wonderful time of year, with colorful leaves and invigorating cool weather. However, for many pests the change in season signals the need to seek shelter from the cold winter ahead ...

>> read “Fall Invaders”    
Hold the Salt

Most of the harm from snow really comes from how we get rid of it. Time for a little rethink. Who doesn’t love new snow? The white blanket softens the world and makes everything look new. And it’s a good thing for the garden. Snow cover insulates the soil so it is less likely to thaw and then freeze again. Enveloping snow protects plant tissue from cold snaps and adds moisture when it melts in spring.

>> read “Hold the Salt”    
Indoors Today, Outdoors Tomorrow

When winter descends, spring’s warmth can’t arrive soon enough for the avid gardener. Many begin designing new garden plans and waiting for winter to thaw. The wait is over. You can garden year round in your home with interior foliage. Any garden veteran can become a successful interiorscaper by applying the same principles he or she uses outdoors. It is all a matter of the right plant in the right place ...

>> read “Indoors Today, Outdoors Tomorrow”    
Clever Crafting for Fall

Ohio has had such a lovely fall this year! With the intense heat of this past summer and the lack of moisture, I was wondering if the leaves wouldn't just turn brown and fall off but alas, the cool evenings and bright sunshine have yielded a fall with vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red. My daughter commented the other morning that the trees were “losing their clothes” and I laughed at the ...

>> read “Clever Crafting for Fall”    
Max Bloom
Tips to Extend the Bloom of 15 Favorite Garden Flowers

Continuous bloom is always a hot topic among gardeners. Here are several ideas and techniques that can help you extend the bloom time of your beloved plants.

>> read “Max Bloom”    
No Fuss…No Till

A growing number of experts say annual tilling is unnecessary—maybe even harmful. Here’s why. Garden wisdom has long held that preparing a vegetable garden means yearly tilling: digging to mix up the top 6 or 8 inches of soil and incorporate new organic matter such as compost to increase its fertility.

>> read “No Fuss…No Till”    
Spring-Blooming Plants, Shrubs and Trees for Early Pollinators

This is the time when we feel most alive and our senses seem to be in overdrive. It’s the promise of renewal and awakening. Spring has finally arrived ...

>> read “Spring-Blooming Plants, Shrubs and Trees for Early Pollinators”    
5 Design Mistakes Home Gardeners Make (and How to Avoid Them)

Garden design and gardening are not necessarily the same thing. Here are the most common design errors, why they are ‘bad’ and how to change your ways.

Here are the top five mistakes I see most often in my work as a professional gardener. They’re easy to fix ...

>> read “5 Design Mistakes Home Gardeners Make (and How to Avoid Them)”    
Your First Herb Garden

According to the National Garden Bureau 2010 saw more first-time gardeners than any time in recent history. Statistics reveal many of these first-time gardeners began with vegetables and plan to add herbs in the coming year. I’ve been growing herbs since childhood, and to me vegetables are interesting, but adding herbs makes them exciting. Tomatoes, for example, are wonderful fresh, but when cooked, they just cry out for some basil, garlic and oregano. Herbs add flavor and pizzazz to vegetables, fish, poultry, even cheese or egg dishes. Herbs are also incredibly easy to grow provided you follow a few basics.

>> read “Your First Herb Garden”    
Green Gap Perennials

Midwestern gardeners have a narrow gap between the cold of winter and heat of summer. But, because of the fickleness of spring weather, there is often a significant gap between the peak of spring bloom (bulbs, roses and early perennials) and the maturity of summer flowers (annuals and summer perennials, such as echinaceas and daylilies). This gap usually becomes apparent throughout late May and early June, when many people’s gardens are green and growing, but with few flowers ...

>> read “Green Gap Perennials”    
Build a Better Rose Garden

Roses have been cultivated for many centuries, but according to legend it was Empress Josephine who created the modern rose garden. Her ambition was to acquire every known variety, and her collection was laid out in orderly rows. Now 200 years later, many rose gardens are still planted out in this style ...

>> read “Build a Better Rose Garden”    
 
 
 

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Kitchen Herb Bouquets
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