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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Trees With Ornamental Bark for Winter Interest

Long after the seasons of spring, summer and autumn have passed, you can still enjoy the trees in your landscape. After the leaves fall, some trees stand out in the garden with their unique bark. Some have bark with interesting texture, while others provide striking colors. An often overlooked feature in the garden, bark is most important in the winter. Trees continue to exude their beauty even in the bleakest of winters ...

>> read “Trees With Ornamental Bark for Winter Interest”       #Feature
Aloes

When you think of aloe, you probably think of Aloe vera, the burn plant, but with the explosion in popularity of succulents in the last several years, many new hybrids, as well as lesser-known species, are now available to plant lovers. These tough plants will enjoy a sunny spot on your summer patio and do equally as well in a sunny window ...

>> read “Aloes”       #Hot Plants
How to Build a Dry Stream Bed

Want more structure to your garden? Have a spot where rain water always puddles? Looking for a hardscape project with a Japanese-inspired look? Ever hear of a dry stream bed? Dry stream beds are decorative stone features that can also carry rain water away from foundations and garden beds ...

>> read “How to Build a Dry Stream Bed”    
Floral Arranging American Style

Is it a bit cheeky to think I can create bouquets like White House Chief of Floral Design Laura Dowling after hearing her speak once? Foolish, perhaps. Fun, certainly.

>> read “Floral Arranging American Style”    
Edible Fig
Ficus carica

Though we wouldn’t plant a fig tree (Ficus carica) outdoors with winter coming, we certainly can buy one to grow indoors then plant outside in the spring. With global climate change and the USDA Planting Zone adjustments, some fig varieties will thrive where before they’d likely have died in temperatures below 10 F ...

>> read “Edible Fig”    
‘Biokovo’ Geranium
Geranium x cantabrigiense ‘Biokovo’

Do you enjoy gardening among refreshing scents? Fascinating spring flowers? Plants with round, lobed, semi-evergreen leaves that turn orange-red-copper in autumn? Do you want an easy care, four-season perennial that spreads by rhizomes? ...

>> read “‘Biokovo’ Geranium”       #Hot Plants   #Spring
Mixing It Up with Cool Cosmos: Notes from My Garden Journal

Amid the autumn plantings, gardeners record plant ideas onto new journal pages this time of year. Cosmos found a way into my writings some time ago, and never left ...

>> read “Mixing It Up with Cool Cosmos: Notes from My Garden Journal”    
The Dog Days Are Over: Summer Blues to Turn Down the Heat

My garden always starts to look tired in August. The roses have long since faded and given up. The daylilies are done screaming “orange!” in the corners. Even the annuals, the proud cheerleaders of color, have exhausted themselves in the heat ...

>> read “The Dog Days Are Over: Summer Blues to Turn Down the Heat”    
New and Unusual Plants to Grow

It’s not too early to start thinking about plants you might want to grow next season. If you look out over this year’s garden area, consider what did well and what you might like to do differently. Most seed catalogs have already gone to print and you’ll start receiving the first ones right after Christmas. Here are a few unusual or so-called “new” plants you might want to try. I’ve had experience growing all of them in Missouri, and I can recommend each one as worthy of including in the garden ...

>> read “New and Unusual Plants to Grow”       #Advice   #Edibles
Northern Crapemyrtle
The Summer Show Can Extend Well Beyond the South

As I skimmed through some of the State-by-State Gardening Midwest magazines, it occurred to me that readers in Northern states, for example in Zones 6 and 5 and in even especially warm spots in Zone 4, can, if done properly, grow crepemyrtle (Lagerstroemia indica). I have a test plot in Ft. Atkinson, Wis., and have had crapemyrtle surviving, growing and flowering the last three years. The first year the plants grew ...

>> read “Northern Crapemyrtle”    
Purpletop Vervain
Verbena bonariensis

I will never run out of plants to discuss as I love so many, but I asked my friends what they will be thinking about in January/February and in unison I heard “seeds.” So, an easy plant from seed it is — one of my favorites is Verbena bonariensis.

>> read “Purpletop Vervain”       #Hot Plants
Summer Stunner

About 12 years ago, I began adding plants to newly created ornamental garden beds in my backyard. This is an area in full sun and has mostly dry soil, except in spring when it can sometimes have standing water for the better part of a day. It’s an area that has proved ideal for growing boltonia ...

>> read “Summer Stunner”    
 
 
 

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