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Featured Articles!

A Spring-time Wonder
The setting for a different kind of blooming adventure.

In the spring, Forty Acre Rock near Lancaster, S.C., goes from drab to dramatic with a burst of flashy colors on a granite outcrop that's the centerpiece of a state preserve. Small wild plants called elf orpine, black-spored quillwort and pool sprite bloom to showcase a mix of red, green and white hues in shallow, water-filled pools. These rare plants put on their show from March through early May, until the pools dry up and Forty Acre Rock's colors revert to dull grays and greens of lichens and mosses.

>> read “A Spring-time Wonder”    
Sneeze-free Gardening
Avoiding allergy problems in the landscape

Let’s face it – it is almost impossible to avoid plants that cause allergies. For one thing, pollen can travel many miles in the wind. It is also unreasonable to expect our neighbors not to use certain plants in their landscapes just because we are allergic to them. However, with a little care it is possible to avoid heavy exposure to the pollens of allergenic plants and be able to enjoy our gardens most of the year.

>> read “Sneeze-free Gardening”    
Creative Conifer Containers

When I was young, I didn’t have much patience for my father’s infatuation with rooting and growing conifers and various evergreens. I was more interested in faster-growing flowers and tropical foliage. Conifers and evergreens were simply too slow for me. But I took another look as my plant palette increased, and found small plants look simply darling in small pots. Then, as they grew larger, I could put them in a larger pot ...

>> read “Creative Conifer Containers”       #Containers
The Traditional Scarecrow

I was halfway through my childhood before finding the nerve to watch The Wizard of Oz without hiding at some point during the film. I suppose it was the witch (the wicked one from the west) — it would be an understatement to say that she intimidated me. The scarecrow was a much more pleasant fellow but, truth be known, he was also a bit unsettling to me ...

>> read “The Traditional Scarecrow”    
Bringing Home the Birds
Keep your feathered friends flocking to your yard

Soon, the pallet of the landscape will be transforming from subtle browns and tans and exploding into splashes of hot pink, white, yellow and purple. The sweet-smelling crabapple blossoms will shower papery petals in a gentle breeze, blanketing the landscape. The rustling chatter and singing of wildlife will fill the once still air. Soon, spring will be here!

>> read “Bringing Home the Birds”    
Annuals to the Rescue
Fill out your yard with color. Try our featured annuals.

You've just been notified of a cancellation on the home and garden tour and your garden has been chosen as a replacement. To add to the excitement, you have a little over a month to get it into full bloom. Don't panic: It's Annuals to the Rescue!

>> read “Annuals to the Rescue”    
Defining Outdoor Spaces
Garden Rooms Exhibit Creativity

The idea that the landscape around our homes is a static, never-changing adornment seems to be giving way as more and more people embrace the notion of garden building. Some treat the terms landscape and garden synonymously, but they are quite different. You can have a perfectly fine landscape and never step foot outside or do a bit of the work yourself. But to have a garden is a different thing. Building a garden requires a personal commitment of time and effort, and it becomes your own living work of art, reflecting your interests, tastes and personality.

>> read “Defining Outdoor Spaces”    
A Hotbed of Ideas
Try These Flowerbed Ideas In Your Own Landscape

Try These Flowerbed Ideas In Your Own Landscape

>> read “A Hotbed of Ideas”    
Savory Okra Pickles

For this recipe, you need six very clean wide-mouth pint jars, sterilized as directed by manufacturer, 6 lids and 6 bands separated into a shallow pot of boiling hot water ...

>> read “Savory Okra Pickles”       #Recipes
The Self-Sufficient Gardener
Developing Transplants from Seed is Easy in a Greenhouse

When growing your own transplants, it is very important to control temperature, ventilation, light and moisture. Temperatures for warm-season crops should be between 65 and 80 F during the day, with nighttime temperatures of 60 to 65 F.

>> read “The Self-Sufficient Gardener”    
Make A Fairy Chair for Your Garden

Gardens are magical places. They’re even more magical when you invite fairy-folk to visit. With an old chair, a basket (or chicken wire) and a few flowering plants, you can make a charming focal point for your garden that fairies can’t resist ...

>> read “Make A Fairy Chair for Your Garden”    
Learning Garden Lingo
Unraveling the colorful language of gardening

Are you occasionally perplexed by a term used in a gardening book or magazine article? You are not alone if — as a newcomer to America’s most popular pastime — you are sometimes confused with terminology such as “friable loam.” Gardening is like many other hobbies, with unique and often colorful lingo ...

>> read “Learning Garden Lingo”    
 
 
 

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