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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Going Vertical Never Looked So Good

Expand your planting space, grow a living screen, or add vertical interest to your garden beds by growing plants on a wall or training them onto an obelisk or trellis.

>> read “Going Vertical Never Looked So Good”       #Containers   #Vines
Minding Your Peas

What’s not to like about peas? The fresh green pods are the epitome of spring. That sweet burst of flavor that explodes in your mouth gives the nod to enjoy the cool spring days, which precede the warm days ahead. Peas are the perfect accompaniment to the sparkling greens of spring, and a quick stop at early farmers markets should give you all you need for delicious spring dining.

>> read “Minding Your Peas”       #Recipes   #Vegetables   #Vines
Clematis 101

Virtually all clematis books are British. I think it’s some kind of law. According to those books, you may pronounce it “klem-a-tiss,” “kli-mah-tiss,” “klem-at-iss” or “klem-ay-tiss.” The plants are fabulous, and will respond no matter how you address them. Most Americans only spiral one up their mailbox post, but the Brits have been exploring the potential of almost 300 species and even more varieties and cultivars, using them far more imaginatively in their gardens for eons.

>> read “Clematis 101”       #Flowers   #Plant Profile   #Vines
Poison Ivy Primer

Itching to get out in the garden? Poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans aka Rhus radicans) includes several subspecies, and is only one of multiple sumacs, many of which are also rash-producing, and the one you’re most likely to tangle with in your own backyard.

>> read “Poison Ivy Primer”       #Health and Safety   #Poisonous Plants   #Vines
Poison Ivy is Everywhere

Ask any gardener what grows really well in your garden, and you may get an answer you don’t want to hear: POISON IVY. Unfortunately, it thrives from Maine to Florida.

Poison ivy manages to grow anywhere – on islands, marshy areas, and forests. Sand, good soil, or among acidic pine needles, poison ivy grows. Worst of all it grows in sun or shade, climbing up, over and around most everything.

>> read “Poison Ivy is Everywhere”       #Natives   #Poisonous Plants   #Vines
 
 
 

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The Ultimate Crop-Cage
Keep your harvest with the Ultimate Crop-Cage

[+] Livi Lou Garden