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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Rock On

Want to create a new kind of small-space garden that is the perfect venue in which to try a new palette of plants? Start a rock garden! Here’s how.
Rock gardens can be created easily and are ideal for gardeners with limited space. Exposure should be full sun for at least five hours but partial shade, especially in the afternoon, is fine ...

>> read “Rock On”    
Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’
Lagerstroemia (indica x fauriei) ‘Pocomoke’

Do you enjoy the late-season flowers of crapemyrtle but don’t have space for a tree? Allow me to introduce you to ‘Pocomoke’—a handsome, dwarf crapemyrtle. It’s not quite knee-high—a densely branched mound of deep rosy-raspberry flowers floating above forest-green leaves.

>> read “Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’”       #Hot Plants
Starting From Scratch with Backyard Chickens

Chickens eat insect pests (including Japanese beetles), aerate the soil, ‘recycle’ kitchen scraps and their droppings are a natural fertilizer. Chickens and gardens really can grow together ...

>> read “Starting From Scratch with Backyard Chickens”    
The Annual Review

Just as they review their yearly financial statement, many gardeners do a plant assessment as they consider their gardens for the following year. This is no different than the trialing done at the Gardens at Ball Horticultural. The few new varieties that follow have been chosen from the broad range of annuals (plus one crossover perennial) that are available for the 2012 market.

>> read “The Annual Review”    
Trumpet Spurflower
Rabdosia longituba

My husband assigned to me the responsibility of watering all the plants in our home garden. This was no light task, since we always had more plants in pots than we had plants in the ground, and in the heat of summer, many of the potted plants had to be watered at least once, if not twice, every day.

>> read “Trumpet Spurflower”       #Hot Plants
Be on the Lookout for Oak Wilt Disease

It starts off with a whimper. Perhaps you decide to prune a branch or two off of your pin oak because they are too close to the house. You found some dried green leaves laying in the yard and thought it was just drought and it’s only June. Or Mother Nature decides to show her force with a violent thunderstorm and knock some branches off your oak trees ...

>> read “Be on the Lookout for Oak Wilt Disease”    
ColorBlaze Keystone Kopper Coleus

The perfect annual for fall gardens, ColorBlaze Keystone Kopper coleus has unique coloring that blends well with many different plant combinations. It looks great with orange, gold, bronze and salmon, yet the purple highlights on the new growth tips contrast nicely with the copper-colored foliage. Use in fall container combinations or as an accent plant in flowerbeds and borders ...

>> read “ColorBlaze Keystone Kopper Coleus”       #Hot Plants
Blue Sedge
Carex glauca ‘Blue Zinger’

This carex is easily grown in medium to wet soils. Ideal light is shade to part shade. Many members of the genus share the common name of rush or sedge. The cultivar ‘Blue Zinger’ refers to the bright blue color of the leaves, which endures winter in all but the coldest temperatures ...

>> read “Blue Sedge”       #Hot Plants
Dangers in the Garden

There are many ways to injure yourself while working in the garden. Here is a safety primer that just might prevent a trip to the ER. If you are traveling to the backyard this summer, you better make sure you’ve had your shots! You also need eye and ear protection, gloves, hard-toed shoes, long-sleeved shirts, and long pants, a hat, sunscreen and insect repellent ...

>> read “Dangers in the Garden”    
How to Build a Cold Frame

A cold frame can help you harden off spring transplants, get a head start on the growing season, and lengthen the fall season for cold-tolerant edibles such as lettuce, kale, radishes and herbs by one to three months. Here’s how to make one from a window and some lumber. You have probably heard this a hundred times: "Harden off seedling plants two weeks before transplanting by moving them to a protected area outdoors or by placing them in a cold frame." But you don't have a cold frame, and perhaps never thought you needed one ...

>> read “How to Build a Cold Frame”    
Facts and Folklore About Late-Blooming Wildflowers

In October, we tend to think the native blooming plants’ seasons are completed. But there are a number of beautiful native wildflowers whose blooms, foliage and seedpods add interest to October and late fall woodlands and prairies. Several species adapt to home gardens and can be found in garden centers or ordered from specialty native plant nurseries. Plus, each has an old story to tell.

>> read “Facts and Folklore About Late-Blooming Wildflowers”       #Flowers
‘Black Velvet’ Petunia
Petunia x hybrid ‘Black Velvet’

‘Black Velvet’ is the latest petunia to hit garden centers and is sure to be a big hit among gardening enthusiasts this spring. This unique black petunia has great potential in the landscape as it looks spectacular mixed with white, yellow and pink colors. Use other colors of petunias or accent ‘Black Velvet’ with delicate flowers like gaura, ‘Snow Princess’ lobularia or euphorbia.

>> read “‘Black Velvet’ Petunia”       #Hot Plants
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Green Dragon
Arisaemia dracontium - rare woodland plant

[+] The Everlasting Gardener