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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

How to: Make a Succulent Planter Out of a Book

Hi, I'm Sarah! Today I'm going to show you how to use an old hardcover book and turn it into a planter for a little succulent. All you'll need for this project are some old hardcover books, (you can find them at Goodwill or a thrift store), some clamps, some plastic to line the hole (I'm using these plastic bags that a lot of people have at home), a stapler, a hot glue gun, I'm using this wood glue (It's Guerrilla wood glue), and a small paint brush, I have some spar urethane that I'll spray on to coat everything, a drill (and I have a 3-inch hole saw attachment on the drill), some small succulent plants and I have some bowls of gravel, sand, and a succulent cactus potting mix here.  

>> read “How to: Make a Succulent Planter Out of a Book”       #Containers   #How to   #Video
How To: Change a Sprinkler Nozzle (Part 2)

Alright. So, now we're in the field, and this head has already been installed. So, it's in the ground, and what I need to do is change the nozzle on it because I did have the wrong size nozzle initially. It's probably a number 2 nozzle, and that wouldn't be big enough for a 360 degree radius - which is what we are using. Instead I'm going to put in a number 6 nozzle, so I've selected a nozzle. It's a number 6 nozzle.

>> read “How To: Change a Sprinkler Nozzle (Part 2)”       #How to   #Irrigation   #Video
How To: Change a Sprinkler Nozzle (Part 1)

Alright, now once we have installed an irrigation system – especially a turf irrigation system, we have to look at adjusting it and getting it to work correctly.

>> read “How To: Change a Sprinkler Nozzle (Part 1)”       #How to   #Irrigation   #Video
How to: Dividing Orchids

Here's an example of an orchid that has been in the same container for probably about ten years in the greenhouse. It really should have been divided 2 or 3 times in that period of time, but since it was not, we will try to show you what you would do to get that back in better shape.

>> read “How to: Dividing Orchids”       #Flowers   #How to   #Ornamentals   #Propagation   #Video
How to Divide a Boston Fern

Today we are going to learn how to, uh, divide up a Boston fern. For this, we need a good, sharp knife.

So, we'll take the, uh, Boston fern which is overgrown, and get it out of the pot to begin with. So, we may have to, uh, we may have to actually cut the pot in order to get it out of there. So we take this and pull the pot from it, and take it, the roots out of there. Discard the pot, of course. We will be getting some new pots for it.

>> read “How to Divide a Boston Fern”    
The Fabulous Four
Need some super-easy houseplants? Try these.

For years, I flatly refused to grow houseplants. I really just don’t have the space, I would tell myself. There’s not nearly enough sunlight in here. And think of the time commitment!

The truth is, a couple of spectacular failures early on, (I’m looking at you, Venus flytrap), bruised my ego and diminished what enthusiasm I did have for bringing the garden indoors.

But of course, like many of us who while away the chillier months perusing glossy gardening magazines, I like a project. And eventually the lure of getting my hands in the dirt proved too strong. So after a bit of research and some trial and error, I’ve rounded up a few of the hardiest, least demanding houseplants out there. These guys are almost un-killable.

>> read “The Fabulous Four”    
Egomania in the Universe
All of nature wants to live forever.

In June I start checking the seedpods of celandine poppy, bloodroot and wild geranium. Already the showoff part of their lives has passed and they are moving on to the next phase – making merry in the plant kingdom. In other words, developing seeds.

All nature wants to reproduce itself. (Talk about egomania.) And when it comes to propagation, my three native woodland spring-bloomers can run amok, tossing their seed hither and yon, no doubt getting a little help from birds and the wind along the way.

>> read “Egomania in the Universe”       #Propagation   #Seeds
Waldorf Salad Recipe

The first Waldorf salad recipe is credited to Oscar Tschirky, a maître d’hotel at the Waldorf Hotel, later named the Waldorf-Astoria. It was introduced in the late 1800s, at which time it did not include nuts. The nuts first appeared in the 1920s and I’ve never been served one without them. Thankfully.

>> read “Waldorf Salad Recipe”       #Recipes
Baked Apples Recipe

Karen Atkins's baked apples recipe

>> read “Baked Apples Recipe”       #Edibles   #Recipes
Decorating Pumpkins Without a Knife

Here’s a kid-friendly project that won’t send shivers down your spine.

When autumn winds turn bone-chilling cold and children dream of becoming vampires, parents might want to have some crafty ideas in their bags of tricks. If you don’t feel like getting pumpkin slime all over the kitchen this year, try this DIY project that doesn’t require 30 minutes just for cleanup.

>> read “Decorating Pumpkins Without a Knife”       #Crafts   #Decorating   #Fall   #Kids
How to Turn Compost into Liquid Fertilizer

Today I'm going to show you how to take compost that you can generate at home and turn it into a liquid biologically active fertilizer that you can use in your home garden.

All you'll need to do this is a bucket or other large container that will hold water, aquarium pump and an air stone for an oxygen source for our soil microbes. And we'll put that down in the water and let it bubble. We'll also use the oxygen to help dechlorinate the water if you're using city water. We'll put our compost in a mesh laundry bag which will function like a teabag. We'll measure our compost in a plastic measuring cup, and then we'll provide the soil microbes in the compost tea with a carbohydrate source. And for that, we'll use unsulfured molasses.

>> read “How to Turn Compost into Liquid Fertilizer”       #Fertilizing   #Video
How To Start Vegetable Seeds

Today I'm going to show you how to get your seeds started for your fall vegetables. You can start vegetable seeds in just about any container you have available. Whether it's an egg carton or the containers from your grocery store delicatessen even to the flats and six packs you save from your spring and summer flowers that you buy at your garden centers.

The only requirement is the bottom of the container allow adequate drainage so we don't have seeds sitting in saturated soil . That'll lead to fungal issues and a condition called damping off as the seeds germinate. What I've done with this flat is line it with paper towels so it'll hold soil and allow adequate drainage at the same time. So, all we have to do is fill this flat with our soil until it's level and then pre-moisten the soil. And, again with compost and a mixture of vermiculite and promix, moistening the soil ahead of time won't be a problem.

>> read “How To Start Vegetable Seeds”       #Edibles   #Fall   #Propagation   #Seeds   #Video

New from our Bloggers:

Late Summer Pennsylvania Garden
Beauties in my early September garden

[+] The Everlasting Gardener