SUBSCRIBE & GET YOUR FREE 10% OFF DISCOUNT CARD
Subscribe Now
Give a Gift
Preview the magazine before you buy.
Read a FREE issue online!
Pennsylvania Gardener Cover

Subscribe Today!
1-888-265-3600

 

  Sign up for our free gardening E-newsletter 
Give us your email address* and we'll provide monthly gardening tips and how-to's, great landscape ideas and plants to try — Delivered right to your inbox!
Your Email:
* Your email address will not be sold or shared with any third parties.

 

Calendar of Events
See our calendar for local events.

 

 

Get Involved
Participate in online discussions with an SBS user account.

Register Now  or  Log in

Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

The Gall of it All

Galls are the enlargement of plant tissue caused by injury or irritation by parasitic organisms such as insects, mites, nematodes, fungi and bacteria. They are also interesting looking — knotty, lumpy and sometimes colorful. Learn which ones are common in your garden.

>> read “The Gall of it All”    
Adding Individuality to the Garden

A garden contains a collection of plants chosen for the location and the role they are to play, but a garden can be much more. It can become an expression of shared memories created over a lifetime – a picture of things that have been important to you. Most residential gardens are obviously personal. However, it can be fun and constructive to review how your garden has evolved and consider what personal touches you might add ...

>> read “Adding Individuality to the Garden”       #Design   #Feature
American Persimmon
Diospyros virginiana

American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana) is a native fruit tree that grows in clearings and open woods from Connecticut to Florida with naturally occurring populations in the southern half of Ohio. A slow-growing, ornamental tree with attractive foliage, fall color and bark, it is adaptable to a range of soils and has few pest or disease problems ...

>> read “American Persimmon”       #Hot Plants
Spring-Flowering Bulbs in Containers

It is never too late to plant those spring-blooming bulbs that somehow never got planted. Pot up bulbs in containers to create a mini-garden that will delight you come springtime.
You ogled their colorful blooms in the bulb catalog. Placed your order. The bulbs arrived in time for fall planting — and then came winter! Whatever the reason, winter came early ...

>> read “Spring-Flowering Bulbs in Containers”    
Oh No! It’s Going to Freeze Tonight!

Few things strike terror in the heart of a gardener more than a forecast for a late spring freeze. And let’s face it, with this year’s rollercoaster ride of temperatures it is hard to know what’s around the corner. But I think you’d agree that if this year’s wacky weather patterns continue, chances are good that a late spring frost could be in your garden’s future. To avoid being caught off guard, here are some tips to help you prepare ...

>> read “Oh No! It’s Going to Freeze Tonight!”    
Majestic Pampas Grass

Pampas is actually a perennial grass, native to South America. It grows in large clumps 8 to 10 feet tall with silvery white, rose, purple or pinkish silken plumes that look like feathers sitting atop long stalks. There are dwarf varieties that grow to a height of 4 to 5 feet tall, which seems to be preferred by those gardeners with a smaller space ...

>> read “Majestic Pampas Grass”    
Create a Faux Rock Garden on a Hillside or Berm

Steeply sloped areas don’t have to be ‘trouble spots.’ Hillsides can be turned into gorgeous rock gardens. Here are some tips.

>> read “Create a Faux Rock Garden on a Hillside or Berm”    
Starting From Scratch with Backyard Chickens

Chickens eat insect pests (including Japanese beetles), aerate the soil, ‘recycle’ kitchen scraps and their droppings are a natural fertilizer. Chickens and gardens really can grow together ...

>> read “Starting From Scratch with Backyard Chickens”    
The Edible Garden: What To Do When

Use this timeline to stay on track in the vegetable garden. But be prepared to make adjustments depending on the weather. Remember the growing season is shorter away from Lake Michigan.

>> read “The Edible Garden: What To Do When”    
Take a Garden Tour Vacation

If you have a strong desire for traveling and a love of horticulture, you may want to consider visiting some premier gardens on your next trip. Our country has numerous exceptional horticultural gardens that are worth going out of your way to explore. I am going to highlight some of my favorites in the Midwest and on the East Coast, and hopefully you will have the chance to work these gems into your travels this year or in the near future ...

>> read “Take a Garden Tour Vacation”    
A Plan to Cram

Getting as many veggies into a raised bed—throughout the short Midwest growing season—is a quest for many gardeners. What goes where, when and why when stuffing raise beds with vegetables and herbs?

>> read “A Plan to Cram”    
Your First Herb Garden

According to the National Garden Bureau 2010 saw more first-time gardeners than any time in recent history. Statistics reveal many of these first-time gardeners began with vegetables and plan to add herbs in the coming year. I’ve been growing herbs since childhood, and to me vegetables are interesting, but adding herbs makes them exciting. Tomatoes, for example, are wonderful fresh, but when cooked, they just cry out for some basil, garlic and oregano. Herbs add flavor and pizzazz to vegetables, fish, poultry, even cheese or egg dishes. Herbs are also incredibly easy to grow provided you follow a few basics.

>> read “Your First Herb Garden”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Green Dragon
Arisaemia dracontium - rare woodland plant

[+] The Everlasting Gardener