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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Natural Repellant

It’s summer, and that means war … on mosquitos! In 2014 Bill Gates called the mosquito “The Deadliest Animal in the World.” They carry a host of debilitating and often fatal diseases. Yes, we can douse ourselves with chemicals, light some incense, or plug in the bug zapper … but rumor has it that plants can also keep mosquitos at bay. The essential oils in some plants and flowers have been said to repel mosquitos, while you should not rely on plants alone to protect you from mosquito bites, you may want to include a few in your landscape or garden.

>> read “Natural Repellant”       #Beneficials   #Insects   #Pests
Welcoming Butterflies

Whatever the size of your garden, you can add excitement and wonder by welcoming beautiful, delicate members of the Lepidoptera family to share your little plot of heaven on earth.

Despite their freewheeling, frivolous demeanor, butterflies follow a deliberate and complex regimen in their day-to-day doings. Their life-cycle consists of four stages: egg, larva (caterpillar), pupa (chrysalis) and adult (butterfly), each stage requiring specific food and environments ...

>> read “Welcoming Butterflies”       #Beneficials   #Insects
Surprising Pollinators

Helping pollinators is a hot gardening trend right now (dare we say there’s a “lot of buzz”?). Initiatives such as the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge are bringing attention to the need to create habitats for at-risk pollinators such as monarch butterflies and honeybees. But many other species – including some surprising ones like flies, moths, and hummingbirds – also act as pollinators, and also need our help.

>> read “Surprising Pollinators”       #Beneficials   #Insects   #Unusual
The Trouble With Honey Bees

If you have paid attention to the news media over the past few years, you probably know honey bees are having problems. One of the most widely publicized is a phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder, or CCD. This problem, which causes entire colonies of bees to die suddenly and mysteriously, was first recognized in the U.S. in 2006. But CCD is just one of a series of new problems to affect U.S. honey bees over the last 30 years.

>> read “The Trouble With Honey Bees”       #Beneficials   #Disease   #Insects
Squish the Squash Bug

The squash bug is common throughout the United States, and it is one of those creatures that truly has a logical name. The Anasa tristis is a true bug, and you surely want to “squash” it when seen.

>> read “Squish the Squash Bug”       #Insects   #Pests   #Vegetables
In Defense of Spiders

Spiders are perhaps some of the most feared and misunderstood inhabitants of any garden. Quickly squashed into “bug juice” without a moment’s hesitation, these beneficials rarely find safe refuge in their garden homes. Yet, despite their fearsome reputations, wise gardeners learn to appreciate these hungry monsters as they go about their daily business patrolling for pests such as mosquitos, flies, aphids, and leafhoppers. Knowing how to live side by side in harmony is a simple matter of understanding what makes them tick – or twitch.

>> read “In Defense of Spiders”       #Beneficials   #Insects   #Wildlife
Control Caterpillar Pests

Caterpillars are vexing pests to many of the plants we grow in our home landscapes and vegetable gardens. There are numerous different species of pest caterpillars, most of which specialize in feeding on a particular group of plants: azalea caterpillars sometimes defoliate whole plantings of azaleas; heavy infestations of bagworms destroy arborvitae trees; tobacco hornworms strip the leaves from homegrown tomatoes; squash borers kill squash and pumpkin vines. And the list goes on.

>> read “Control Caterpillar Pests”       #Advice   #Insects   #Pests
Making a Moon-Moth Garden

Many people enjoy their gardens during the daylight hours and head indoors as the sun starts to set. But if you install a moon-moth garden, you’ll find yourself anticipating the approach of late afternoon and early evening when you’ll be able to watch the flowers open followed by the night insect visitors (mostly moths).

>> read “Making a Moon-Moth Garden”       #Flowers   #Insects   #White
A Helping Hand From the Birds and Bees

When it comes to gardening, many think of wildlife as problematic, when, in most cases, just the opposite is true. As most gardeners can attest, there is a lot that goes into managing a garden. No matter the size, there’s always something to do – like soil prepping, weeding, watering, planting – you get the idea. With all that we do to help improve our chances for success, we’re not the only ones in control. Believe it or not, there are other busy workers out and about giving us a helping hand, and their presence could determine the success or failure of our efforts – and no one does this better than our native wildlife, especially the birds and bees.

>> read “A Helping Hand From the Birds and Bees”       #Birds   #Insects   #Wildlife
Where Are They Now?

People don’t often think about insects in winter. Frankly, most people don’t think about insects at all except when they are being tormented by mosquitoes in the summer. As gardeners, we tend to consider insects and the natural world more frequently than other people, but what happens to the pests that drive us crazy and the other bugs that fascinate us during warmer months?

>> read “Where Are They Now?”       #Insects   #Pests   #Winter
Stop the Vampires!
Gardening Practices to keep mosquitoes down in your yard

Besides ruining a day in the yard, certain mosquitoes can transmit West Nile and other diseases in their quest for the blood needed to produce eggs. In fall, mosquitoes mate and the males die. The females spend the cold months hidden in protected places, such as hollow logs and in the cracks of buildings. So it is a good practice to clean up debris and caulk buildings in fall.

>> read “Stop the Vampires!”       #Beneficials   #Health and Safety   #Insects   #Pests
A Bit About Bees

You can try this at home! Growing bee-friendly plants is one way to help increase the bee population. Another way is to actually raise bees.

>> read “A Bit About Bees”       #Edibles   #Insects