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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Gardening When it Hurts

After a day of gardening, do you crawl into bed with a heat pack, an ice pack or maybe even a six-pack? Do you have special pillows for knee pain, neck pain and a pair of wrist splints for carpal tunnel pain? When you limp to the kitchen for a midnight snack of aspirin, are there so many magnets strapped to your body that you stick to the refrigerator door?

>> read “Gardening When it Hurts”    
Don’t Cry for Me

We use a catchall term, weeping trees, to describe trees that are pendulous in nature. But so many other adjectives can be used to describe them. Some cascade; some drop like a curtain of rain, straight to the earth; others puddle and leapfrog along the ground; and a few stretch out as if they have wings and look as though they could take flight. People seem to either love them or hate them. The latter find them sad looking or depressing while the former find grace and elegance in their forms ...

>> read “Don’t Cry for Me”    
A Go-To Plant

Is there something in your wardrobe, a go-to outfit that you throw on when you need to look good and don’t have time to put a lot of thought into it? I’d be lost without those reliable clothes in my closet. In my garden, that role is filled by Sesleria autumnalis. This grass is commonly called autumn moor grass. I call it “friend” ...

>> read “A Go-To Plant”    
Double Barrel Drought Busters

Re-purpose a bedraggled bed to become a rainwater harvesting area with two linked rain barrels. Just be sure to pick the right site (out of sight, preferably) and properly link them together.

>> read “Double Barrel Drought Busters”    
Morgan Oriental Arborvitae
Thuja orientalis ’Morgan’

The very rare, “nearly perfect” plant in the landscape, the compact Morgan Oriental arborvitae (Thuja orientalis ‘Morgan’) is slow-growing to 3 to 4 feet and offers shimmering lime-green foliage in the summer. Foliage turns to an attractive burgundy-orange color in the fall — beginning in September and October in northern areas ...

>> read “Morgan Oriental Arborvitae”       #Hot Plants
Korean Chrysanthemum
Dendranthema zawadskii

The warm, soft tints of Korean chrysanthemum (Dendranthema zawadsii) flowers create a color counterpoint to fall foliage in the October garden. Korean chrysanthemums are later-booming and have a softer form than typical garden mums. The foliage of Korean mums forms an attractive mounding shape all season long ...

>> read “Korean Chrysanthemum”       #Hot Plants
Dangers in the Garden

There are many ways to injure yourself while working in the garden. Here is a safety primer that just might prevent a trip to the ER. If you are traveling to the backyard this summer, you better make sure you’ve had your shots! You also need eye and ear protection, gloves, hard-toed shoes, long-sleeved shirts, and long pants, a hat, sunscreen and insect repellent ...

>> read “Dangers in the Garden”    
American Persimmon
Diospyros virginiana

American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana) is a native fruit tree that grows in clearings and open woods from Connecticut to Florida with naturally occurring populations in the southern half of Ohio. A slow-growing, ornamental tree with attractive foliage, fall color and bark, it is adaptable to a range of soils and has few pest or disease problems ...

>> read “American Persimmon”       #Hot Plants
Ficus benjamina as a Bonsai Plant
Ficus benjamina

Bonsai (pronounced BONE-sigh) plants are one of the fastest selling items in our Botanical Conservatory’s Gift Shop. The plants make great gifts and are small enough that they will fit into any brightly lit space. The bonsai are created by members of the local Bonsai Club who volunteer at our greenhouse. Ficus benjamina is the plant they use for most of their bonsai and recommend for first-timers. Creating a bonsai is considered an art, and the plants require more care than the average houseplant, but with minimal input you will be successful ...

>> read “Ficus benjamina as a Bonsai Plant”       #Hot Plants
Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest

With the cold winter behind and the warm, humid summer just about here, I begin to dream of the tropics, and with that, the full-flavored, juicy fruit whose sweet fragrances fill outdoor markets and lone fruit stands on the side roads. Sadly though, with the economy not cooperating and the present fashion to have stay-cations, I have decided I could and would have both. Thus began my search for the ever-elusive tropical fruits that I could grow in my Kentucky backyard garden.

>> read “Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest”    
Rock On

Want to create a new kind of small-space garden that is the perfect venue in which to try a new palette of plants? Start a rock garden! Here’s how.
Rock gardens can be created easily and are ideal for gardeners with limited space. Exposure should be full sun for at least five hours but partial shade, especially in the afternoon, is fine ...

>> read “Rock On”    
Winter Is for Reading

You don’t have to drool over catalogs with photographs of pastel petals dripping in dew, now arriving by the armloads, to feed your flower addiction in winter. Instead you can discover great, important, entertaining, informing and jaw-dropping beautiful garden books, magazines and pictures — with expired copyrights — completely free on the Internet. Everything you ever wanted to see and everything you never knew you wanted to see ...

>> read “Winter Is for Reading”    
 
 
 

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