SUBSCRIBE & GET YOUR FREE 10% OFF DISCOUNT CARD
Subscribe Now
Give a Gift
Preview the magazine before you buy.
Read a FREE issue online!
Ohio Gardener Cover

Subscribe Today!
1-888-265-3600

 

  Sign up for our free gardening E-newsletter 
Give us your email address* and we'll provide monthly gardening tips and how-to's, great landscape ideas and plants to try — Delivered right to your inbox!
Your Email:
* Your email address will not be sold or shared with any third parties.

 

Calendar of Events
See our calendar for local events.

 

 

Get Involved
Participate in online discussions with an SBS user account.

Register Now  or  Log in

Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

New and Unusual Plants to Grow

It’s not too early to start thinking about plants you might want to grow next season. If you look out over this year’s garden area, consider what did well and what you might like to do differently. Most seed catalogs have already gone to print and you’ll start receiving the first ones right after Christmas. Here are a few unusual or so-called “new” plants you might want to try. I’ve had experience growing all of them in Missouri, and I can recommend each one as worthy of including in the garden ...

>> read “New and Unusual Plants to Grow”       #Advice   #Edibles
Summer Stunner

About 12 years ago, I began adding plants to newly created ornamental garden beds in my backyard. This is an area in full sun and has mostly dry soil, except in spring when it can sometimes have standing water for the better part of a day. It’s an area that has proved ideal for growing boltonia ...

>> read “Summer Stunner”    
Hold the Salt

Most of the harm from snow really comes from how we get rid of it. Time for a little rethink. Who doesn’t love new snow? The white blanket softens the world and makes everything look new. And it’s a good thing for the garden. Snow cover insulates the soil so it is less likely to thaw and then freeze again. Enveloping snow protects plant tissue from cold snaps and adds moisture when it melts in spring.

>> read “Hold the Salt”    
Welcome the Birds

Have you ever wondered why you see more birds in local forest preserves than in your yard? Why some birds are seen in the suburbs but not in the city? Have you ever tried to attract hummingbirds or orioles by putting out special bird feeders, only to have them ignored? What can you do to attract more birds to your yard ...

>> read “Welcome the Birds”    
Don’t Cry for Me

We use a catchall term, weeping trees, to describe trees that are pendulous in nature. But so many other adjectives can be used to describe them. Some cascade; some drop like a curtain of rain, straight to the earth; others puddle and leapfrog along the ground; and a few stretch out as if they have wings and look as though they could take flight. People seem to either love them or hate them. The latter find them sad looking or depressing while the former find grace and elegance in their forms ...

>> read “Don’t Cry for Me”    
Why Do Plants Fail?

Even experts can kill plants—which is why Roy Diblik offers seven common reasons perennials die.
It’s happened to us all. We have plants (usually the prized, expensive ones) that grow for a season—or maybe a few years—and then they die ...

>> read “Why Do Plants Fail?”    
‘Black Velvet’ Petunia
Petunia x hybrid ‘Black Velvet’

‘Black Velvet’ is the latest petunia to hit garden centers and is sure to be a big hit among gardening enthusiasts this spring. This unique black petunia has great potential in the landscape as it looks spectacular mixed with white, yellow and pink colors. Use other colors of petunias or accent ‘Black Velvet’ with delicate flowers like gaura, ‘Snow Princess’ lobularia or euphorbia.

>> read “‘Black Velvet’ Petunia”       #Hot Plants
2013 Best New Plants

So many new plants to choose from, so little space on the page to write about them. How will I ever choose which ones to share? I’ve come to the conclusion that no matter what, I cannot possibly cover even a fraction of all the new plant introductions I’d like to tell you passionate plant people about. What to do? I’ll let someone else help me! Let me share with you some new plants that were ...

>> read “2013 Best New Plants”    
Cornucopia - Giving Thanks for the Harvest

If you mention the word “cornucopia,” nearly everyone envisions a pointy basket with fresh fruits and vegetables spilling from its mouth. It’s a common sight this time of the year — autumn, harvest and Thanksgiving — and we see it appearing on everything from greeting cards to decorator items for the home.

>> read “Cornucopia - Giving Thanks for the Harvest”    
Appreciate the Beneficials

About 96 percent of all bugs you see are beneficial insects. These insects provide plants with protection, help with pollination and keep the bad bug population in check. They’re not only beneficial to plants but they’re also beneficial to gardeners.

>> read “Appreciate the Beneficials”    
The Power of the Edit

From a design perspective, at times we need to reacquaint ourselves with the notion that — sometimes — less is more. As gardeners, we know and value the importance of diversity. It’s a good thing, too. Each year, new varieties of everything flood the market, and we are encouraged to try them all ...

>> read “The Power of the Edit”    
Invasive Invaders

Many species of non-native invasive plants, insects and animals plague the Midwest. Why should gardeners care? Here is what you need to know. Chestnut blight in the early 1900s. Dutch elm disease in the mid-1900s. Emerald ash borer in the early 2000s. Asian longhorned beetle has been discovered in five states with the most recent find in Ohio. The list of invasive species goes on and grows ...

>> read “Invasive Invaders”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:

We are recruiting bloggers in your state.