TENNESSEE ARTICLE ARCHIVE

Below you will find our growing collection of Tennessee-specific articles. Enjoy!

SAM ROGERS

Visionary of a Native American interpretive garden Story by Margeaux Emery Sustainability weaves like a thread through the career of landscape architect Sam Rogers, FASLA. In Chattanooga, Rogers planned parks and greenways and coordinated environmental inventories and assessments. As a professor at the University of Tennessee for 29 years, he taught students how to design …

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QUEENS OF THE GARDEN

The long-lived and spectacular clematis Story by Troy B. Marden troybmarden.com One of the very first vines I ever grew was the old-fashioned purple Clematis ‘Jackmanii’. I was 6 years old. This was back in the day when almost every store that offered general merchandise had a garden section where houseplants were offered year round …

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HAKONE GRASS

Story and Photos by Hubert P. Conlon whatgrowsthere.com Brighten up dark areas in your woodland garden with Japanese forest grass, sometimes called hakone grass. This warm-season ornamental grass performs well in most areas of Tennessee; it may struggle a bit in the warmer regions.  Start by planting in amended, compost-rich soil in full to partial …

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SCREAMIN YELLOW FALSE INDIGO

Story by Hubert P. Conlon Yellow false indigo is native to the lower Midwest and Gulf states. ‘Screamin’ Yellow’ is an outstanding cultivar that was originally found in Arkansas. It grows more compact and blooms heavier than the species.  This vigorous clump grower blooms on sturdy, upright stems. In early May, 12-inch spikes of bright …

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Photo By Dr. David Sanford.

OYAMA MAGNOLIA

Story by Hugh Conlon Oyama magnolia, indigenous to eastern Asia, is a deciduous 10-15 feet tall tree or shrub ideally suited for a small garden. Nodding, goblet-shaped, fragrant flowers bloom two to three weeks after the leaves emerge in April, thereby escaping injury from spring frosts. In mid to late May, egg-shaped flower buds unfold …

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DAWN VIBURNUM

Story and Photos by Hubert P. Conlon Visit his blog here: whatgrowsthere.com ‘Dawn’ viburnum is a multi-stemmed, 8-10-foot-tall shrub that blooms in late winter and deserves to be planted in more Tennessee gardens (USDA Hardiness Zones 5-9). It offers four seasons of landscape beauty. In the first warm days of March, the reddish buds swell …

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