Plant Profile

A FACE ONLY A GARDENER COULD LOVE

Bat-faced cuphea Story and Photos by Alan Pulley Referred to as “bat-faced” because of its interesting little bat-faced deep purple and bright red blooms, Cuphea llavea has become a favorite summer annual for many gardeners, including myself.  Native to Central America and Mexico, bat-face cuphea thrives in full sun and heat. Blooms emerge in late spring and …

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Photo By Dr. David Sanford.

OYAMA MAGNOLIA

Story by Hugh Conlon Oyama magnolia, indigenous to eastern Asia, is a deciduous 10-15 feet tall tree or shrub ideally suited for a small garden. Nodding, goblet-shaped, fragrant flowers bloom two to three weeks after the leaves emerge in April, thereby escaping injury from spring frosts. In mid to late May, egg-shaped flower buds unfold …

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Photo by Hans Braxmeier /Pixabay.Com

HYSSOP

Story by Kenny Coogan kennycoogan.com Hyssop can be grown in containers, along perennial borders, or trimmed to form a low hedge in sunny gardens or along walkways. Author Henry Beston of Herbs and the Earth (1935) says, “The garden has no more quietly dependable and satisfactory border plant.” Hyssop’s showy purplish blue, pink, or white flowers …

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DON’T CRY OVER SPILLED WINE

‘Spilled Wine’ weigela Story by Andrea Dee Spilled Wine weigela pours color and character into the landscape. Its magnificent magenta flowers carpet dark purple black wavy foliage from late spring into summer. The foliage holds its vivid color through summer into fall, contrasting nicely with companion chartreuse- and dark-green-leafed shrubs. Similar to other weigelas, hummingbirds …

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GET STOKED FOR ASTERS!

Stokes’ aster Story and Photos by Norman Winter Stokes’ asters (Stokesia laevis) are wonderful native perennials that attract all sorts of pollinators – from bees to butterflies. Its striking blue flowers and fiery orange butterflies make for a winning combination.  The Stokes’ aster is a native from Louisiana eastward to North Carolina. Surprisingly, they are …

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